KINKSHAMER: Realistic Fetishes

Kinkshamer

Here’s something for a change. Progressive Metalcore/Deathcore duo from Pomona, CA, Kinkshamer explores kinks and fetishes on their upcoming EP ‘Societal Sects.’ Premiering today is a debut single for “A Most Vulgar Display,” hit the play button below, and check the interview with the band.

Define the mission of Kinkshamer.

I think most bands begin simply as an outlet to express one’s emotions and thoughts, but as Kinkshamer came to fruition, it became quite clear that we indeed had a mission. As we began to brainstorm around the concept of the band, we started to notice there was a void in the metal music community in regards to the discussion of kinks and fetishes. Of course, there are a chunk of bands in metal history that have glossed over sexual content like the whole androgynous and sexualized glam metal fad during the ’80s or the over-the-top gore-based sex themes in death metal like Cannibal Corpse’s “Fucked with a Knife.” While the two previously mentioned executions of fusing sex with metal are certainly valid in their own time and place, Kinkshamer instead aims to shine a light on the realm of BDSM culture, realistic fetishes, and other unexplored territories of the kink community. Granted, we’ll admit that some of our lyrical content and themes can lean a tad on the hyperbolic side of the spectrum, yet nonetheless I personally feel that the topics that we’re covering are important and relevant considering almost everyone is a sexual being with inevitably dark taboo thoughts.

Tell me about the creative process that informed your upcoming EP Societal Sects and the themes it captures.

When it comes to Kinkshamer’s songs, the concept driving the band is the notion that every track revolves around a specific fetish. With that mindset as our foundation, we made a list of fetishes we wanted to cover and begin fleshing out the lyrics. For the Societal Sects EP, we have an instrumental opener and several songs that follow, each about a different fetish, fantasy, or kink. If you listen to our debut single “A Most Vulgar Display” off the upcoming EP, I think the fetish for that track is definitely obvious right away.

What is the message you are trying to give with Societal Sects

Besides the fact that each song is dedicated to a certain fetish, I’d say the overall message behind the Societal Sects EP is that society plays a huge role in kink. I think it’s important to question why we deem some forms of sex to be normal and other forms to be taboo. Also, I believe that the way a society functions is responsible for the creation of certain fetishes. I find it extremely interesting how in certain countries, a fetish can be somewhat mainstream where it is non-existant in other parts of the globe. This also applies to metal music where certain subgenres are very popular or less established depending on the country. To me, this reveals that both kink and metal music is a global phenomena, engrained in potentially every being, although is inevitably shaped and molded by the society in which the person belongs.

Kinkshamer - Societal Sects

How did you document the music while it was being formulated?

The writing of the lyrics and the music was done separately by two different members. Then we came together and tried fitting the lyrics into the instrumental demos, seeing where everything would fit. We had to edit the lyrics and the music to get where everything felt snug and right, but once we added the samples, I think the songs came together quite cohesively.

Is the dynamic flow of the pieces carefully architected?

I’d like to think so, yes. A lot of modern metal in the deathcore scene is somewhat lacking in dynamics nowadays, choosing intensity and brutality over variety in dynamics and song structure. When it came to songwriting, we let whatever flow creatively and then tweaked it to where we felt there was enough variety to keep it interesting. We’ve showed a few people the single before it was released and they commented saying it was a bit all over the place in terms of songwriting and we take that as a compliment. Even though our influences for Kinkshamer are mostly metalcore and deathcore based, we are inspired from a myriad of different genres from prog and pop-punk to grunge and electronic. We hope that the diversity in our influences also emerges in our music allowing for a diverse and dynamic listen.

Describe the approach to recording the EP.

The music writing and recording process was relatively straight-forward. We programmed the drums as well as recorded bass and guitar all within the comforts of our little home studio. Since the music was written and recorded separately from the lyrics, we then had to choose which instrumental demos would fit best for each song’s theme. Once we matched the lyrics with the music, we recorded the vocals and then added the samples to really drive home what fetish that the song encapsulated.

How long was Societal Sects‘ in the making?

The concept of Kinkshamer was first created back in maybe March or April of this year. Writing the music began quite immediately after that. In the beginning we were actually aiming for a 10 song album, but we decided it would be a smarter approach to introduce the band to the world with an EP. The writing and recording process was very on and off due to our busy schedules, but we’re really happy to finally release this single and be on the tail-end of finishing up the EP. Overall though, I suppose Societal Sects‘ has taken about seven to eight months to complete.

Which bands or artists influenced your work on the release?

After the Burial’s unique djent/metalcore style was likely the main influence for the music, but there’s plenty of other modern prog, metalcore, deathcore, or hardcore bands that have been influential in our writing style such as Born of Osiris, Silent Planet, PeripheryVeil of Maya, VolumesThe ContortionistSikTh, The Dali Thundering Concept, Fallujah, and Knocked Loose. As for the aesthetic and concept behind Kinkshamer, I think our inspiration dates back to early Nine Inch Nails and Marilyn Manson. The imagery that Trent Reznor created in the Broken EP and The Downward Spiral was revolutionary for the time and I think maybe the most accurate musical depiction of the kink community. Manson had a similar effect on Antichrist Superstar too.

What is your view on technology in music?

We think it’s definitely essential, at least in the context of Kinkshamer. Technology made recording our material way more efficient and explore different sounds within our songs. Many modern prog acts are using more electronic soundscapes and synths in their music and I’m all for it. With all that being said, I don’t think technology always has a positive impact on music or the music industry. The paradigm shift from physical CDs to mp3s to streaming has made the financial situation in the music industry more harsh, but that’s the reality we have to live with and embrace. On the other hand, technology has allowed for bands to reach more listeners on a global level. So, there’s definitely pros and cons to technology’s increasing presence in music.

Do you see your music as serving a purpose beyond music?

For starters, if people simply enjoy our music for the sake of art, then we feel we have done our job. However, we’d love if our music is able to provoke feelings, questions, or curiousities about the sexual content in our music. I’d say there’s plenty of individuals in our society who are confused or insecure about their own sexual identity and I hope that Kinkshamer’s music is able to push the listeners to be introspective about themselves. Furthermore, I think our music may create open conversation about the kink community.

What are your plans for the future?  

We’re currently working hard on finishing up the EP and promoting the new single. Once the EP is released, we’re hoping to hit up some live shows and maybe embark on a mini-tour. As for the band in the long run, we definitely have ideas for further songs within a full-length album.

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