Herba d’Hamelí – Girafes a Sibèria & Amoeba Split – Dance of the Goodbyes

Today we bring you two albums you might want to check out. The bands have a lot of in common, musically and geographically, but these are not the reasons why I brought them up.

Herba d’Hameli is coming from Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Their music relies on Canterbury prog rock, but certainly less jazzy than their fellow countrymen Planeta Imaginario. The album in question, called Girafes a Sibèria was released in 2011 and it’s a real shame how did it pass unnoticed by me. Been listening to it A LOT last days and by every listen it gets more and more ripen.

These Barcelonians list Jethro Tull, Camel, King Crimson and another Spanish like, Iceberg as their main influences. Though, there are no prog rock bands that mention (almost) the same references, Herba d’Hameli comes as a refreshing act. The band is active since 2001 (another reason to blush) and if I found it right, Girafes a Sibèria is their fourth album.

<a href=”http://herbahameli.bandcamp.com/album/girafes-a-sib-ria” mce_href=”http://herbahameli.bandcamp.com/album/girafes-a-sib-ria”>Girafes a Sibèria by Herba d’Hamelí</a>

It’s nice to see that Rock Progresivo Español is doing very well. Along with Herba d’Hamelí and aforementioned Planeta Imaginario, there is yet another band from Spain which debut album came as a big surprise for me. The band’s name is Amoeba Split and they are from A Coruña. I was approached by the band’s bassist/guitarist Alberto Villaroya, who introduced me to their work through their only release out to date Dance of the Goodbyes.

This album is structurally much more into the Canterbury style progressive rock, with plenty of jazz and classical elements. It is comprised of six tracks, with three of them clocking over 10 minutes and was nominated by Italian website Progawards as “Best debut album of 2010″. I am glad that someone noticed these folks and deservedly gave any such award.

This record is spluttering of so many great moments and it has to be mentioned that the album feature a female singer (singing in English unlike Herba d’Hamelí which lyrics are in Spanish and have to say that they fit very good) María Toro, who also handles the flutes on the album.

In the years when progressive rock is experiencing many changes in its shape, Herba d’Hamelí and Amoeba Split with few others, are not reinventing the wheels, but rather making it clear that some traditions have to be respected. Respect!

<a href=”http://herbahameli.bandcamp.com/album/girafes-a-sib-ria” mce_href=”http://herbahameli.bandcamp.com/album/girafes-a-sib-ria”>Girafes a Sibèria by Herba d’Hamelí</a>

Nikola Savić is a prog enthusiast, blogger and author, in addition to being the founder of Prog Sphere, Progify, ProgLyrics and the ongoing Progstravaganza compilation series.

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